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20121027
20121104
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
at religion first. we are talking about 23% of the evangelicals in colorado and only 2% mormon. the bottom line is can you take religion and does that directly correlate to votes? >> not only religion, but in the state of colorado, let's look at people there. they are fiercely independent. they maintain their strong values in their western traditions. if you look at the unemployment rate it is very high. mitt romney has momentum there. but if you look at the ballot initiatives -- >> one second. we will slow down. the unemployment high is not that high. it is 8%. i am just saying. >> exactly. >> we would like no one to be out of a job. >> exactly. >> you can't say it is very high. >> well, when the president says if you pass my jobs bill and my stimulus plan that unemployment would be 5.4%, arthel, that's high. to get back to what i sac weighing about the ballot initiatives, if you look at the initiatives that would push them and dealing with increasing government spending and increasing taxes. that goes to mitt romney's platform. >> all right. ryan, let me talk to you right now. we know th
going to bordeaux and saying to people, "i've got a great new religion for you and, by the way, give up your wine." >> narrator: the task: to put on a suit and tie, and climb on your bicycle. >> the tried and true and well-worn method was knocking on doors. and so we knocked on thousands and thousands and thousands of doors. >> the mormon mission does teach you to deal with rejection. most people are not thrilled to see a pair of mormon missionaries on their door. >> narrator: rejection was at the heart of the experience. >> and it means cultivating your own inner spiritual life. where else are you going to get the resources and the strength to carry on this difficult work of knocking on people's doors and pleading with them to listen to you unless you feel like god is with you? >> narrator: and during that time, mitt was worried about the news from home. his father was running for president. >> we would get a hold of the herald tribuand kind of keep up on what was happening. >> narrator: the news was not good. george's campaign was in trouble. he had changed his position on the vietnam
with china. we didn't have diplomatic religion. no concrete exchange. mostly balancing the soviet union during the cold war and talking in strategic terms about global affairs. in the '90s we began to pick up concrete exchanges and i was fortunate in to be china and increase trade and sellings arms to china cooperating in afghanistan and along the soviet border. but then along came [inaudible] so in the '90s the relationship had to adjust to two new dramatic element. the glue that held us together in the '70s and '80s. it was gone. the cold war was over. in a healthy way, e with had to greatly expand our relationship with china. but at the same time because of [inaudible] the human right issue got more prominent, and it was much more difficult to deal with china in terms of domestic politic. the '90s was a matter of dick and myself trying to struggle to how we can get the relationship on a broader basis and increase the exchanges. by the time we get to 2000 china is becoming a major power in the world and our interactions become in chris' and your turn much more extension and healthy an
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)